Nurturing the Caregiver: Discovering the secrets to reducing stress while caring for others

Mary Shackelford will be presenting this webinar for #PSAW2019

The demands on health care workers have never been greater. Many feel stressed-out, overwhelmed and anxious. In fact, many are experiencing deeper levels of stress known as burnout or compassion fatigue. Studies show health care workers who are over stressed or suffering from burnout may also experience impaired attention, memory, and executive function that decrease recall and attention to detail. These effects of stress impact the health care worker, their families and even their patients. The negative impact of stress can increase safety lapses placing clinicians and patients at higher risk for errors.
Research shows that lasting resiliency and healing must come from the inside out. Unfortunately, our culture does not readily teach or demonstrate how to do this. Fortunately, we have access to and understanding of time tested, ancient practices to support self-regulation, self-care, resiliency and healing. These practices have been shown to help regulate and influence the stress response (fight or flight), calm the mind and facilitate more balance and harmony.
The bottom line is that you cannot give what you don’t have. If you feel depleted and empty, there is no way you can come to your life or your patients with focus, attention, patience, high energy and joy.
This personal and professional development program will provide participants with an introduction to self-care as a foundation for their practice. Caring for self is the portal for caring for others. The program is designed to explore the importance of self care, both personally and professionally, and its healing impact on the lives of both caregiver and patient. Participants will be provided easy, every day tools and practices to begin to expand self-care, reduce stress and ultimately find fulfillment in their practice.
Participants will be able to:
• Describe the stress response
• Define compassion fatigue and burnout
• State 2 personal barriers to self care
• Demonstrate a specific stress reducing technique
• Identify at least 3 self

REGISTER HERE

Survey on Patient Safety – Hospitals Webinar

Culture impacts everything we do.  And it’s no different in health care organizations.  The strongest cultures support employee engagement, promote open communication and the sharing of mistakes to foster improvement.

Learn about how the Center’s survey administrative survey can save you time and money and why measuring your culture is so important to improve patient safety.

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how taking the Survey on Patient Safety can help you improve patient safety:

Benefits of CPS Safety Culture Survey Services:

  • Deepest feedback reports in the industry!
  • Comprehensive reports at the organization and department-level!

SAVE TIME & MONEY! Save 30+ hours of administrative time.  You’ll need about 2 hours for the entire process and we’ll take care of the rest!

  • ACCESSIBLE – online, anonymous survey with access via computer, smart-phone, tablet, etc
  • DATA ANALYSIS – data is analyzed for you
  • SUPPORT – we’ll talk with you about your results and guide you to your next steps

April 18th, 2017  from 12-1pm (Central)

REGISTER HERE!!

Hospital PSO 101 – What you should know

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how joining a PSO can help you meet the requirements of the new CMS regulation for requirements under the Affordable Care Act by January 2017:
1. Learn the benefits of joining a Patient Safety Organization (PSO)
2. Learn how joining a PSO can support your patient safety efforts
3. Learn how the PSO protections can apply to your organization
This webinar is open to healthcare professionals in hospitals with a desire to improve patient safety and reduce patient risk, including professionals working in quality, risk, patient safety, quality improvement, and legal staff, executive leaders, and outside counsel and consultants for hospitals or health systems.

Tuesday, July 11 from 12-1pm Central

REGISTER HERE!!

Leadership, Louder than Words: C-Suite Ambassadors of Patient Safety

Committed c-suite leadership to inspire a shared vision is the most critical element in a successful patient safety program. This non-delegable responsibility sets the example by supporting an open and transparent environment, fostering a patient safety culture among all caregivers.

Learn how senior leaders use these steps to provide and support a safer care venue for all patients:

  • Assessing the Culture
  • Integrating patient safety into your strategic plan
  • Supporting your patient safety plan
  • Improving your care processes
  • Sustaining the gains with redesign and high reliability

Tuesday, May 16 from 12-1 pm (Central)

To Register, Click Here.

Hospital PSO 101 – What you should know

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how joining a PSO can help you meet the requirements of the new CMS regulation for requirements under the Affordable Care Act by January 2017:
1. Learn the benefits of joining a Patient Safety Organization (PSO)
2. Learn how joining a PSO can support your patient safety efforts
3. Learn how the PSO protections can apply to your organization
This webinar is open to healthcare professionals in hospitals with a desire to improve patient safety and reduce patient risk, including professionals working in quality, risk, patient safety, quality improvement, and legal staff, executive leaders, and outside counsel and consultants for hospitals or health systems.

Tuesday, July 11 from 12-1pm Central

REGISTER HERE!!

Patient Safety: A Practical Approach from CPS Experts

The Center for Patient Safety works with providers across the care continuum to implement practical and creative solutions to improve patient safety. Join us as we share our expertise on topics like the patient safety culture assessment, culture strategies, improvement best practices, PSOs, and more. We’ll share tips and science to give you a boost in your improvement efforts.

To register, Click Here.

Safety Culture Assessment-Long Term Care

Culture impacts everything we do. The strongest cultures support employee engagement, promote open communication and the sharing of mistakes to foster improvement.  It’s no different in health care organizations.  But it can be hard to assess the culture in your own organization.

Learn about how the Center’s comprehensive safety culture survey can save you time and money and why measuring your culture is so important to improve resident safety.

FREE WEBINAR 9/14/2017

Thursday, September 14th from 1-2pm (Central)

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how taking the Survey on Patient Safety can help you improve patient safety:

Benefits of CPS Safety Culture Survey Services: •Deepest feedback reports in the industry!

  • Comprehensive reports at the organization and department-level!
  • SAVE TIME & MONEY! Save 30+ hours of administrative time. You’ll need about 2 hours for the entire process and we’ll take care of the rest!
  • ACCESSIBLE – online, anonymous survey with access via computer, smart-phone, tablet, etc
  • DATA ANALYSIS – data is analyzed for you
  • SUPPORT – we’ll talk with you about your results and guide you to your next steps

To Register, Click Here.

 

Leadership, Louder than Words: C-Suite Ambassadors of Patient Safety

Committed c-suite leadership to inspire a shared vision is the most critical element in a successful patient safety program. This non-delegable responsibility sets the example by supporting an open and transparent environment, fostering a patient safety culture among all caregivers.

Learn how senior leaders use these steps to provide and support a safer care venue for all patients:

  • Learn how to integrate patient safety into the organizational strategic plan
  • Identify supporting components of a patient safety plan and how to improve care processes
  • Recognize and adopt program efficiencies with redesign and high reliability

Tuesday, May 16 from 12-1 pm (Central)

To Register, Click Here.

*Webinar cost is $59.00.

Patient Safety: A Practical Approach from CPS Experts

The Center for Patient Safety works with providers across the care continuum to implement practical and creative solutions to improve patient safety. Join us as we share our expertise on topics like the patient safety culture assessment, culture strategies, improvement best practices, PSOs, and more. We’ll share tips and science to give you a boost in your improvement efforts.

To register, Click Here.

Florida Supreme Court’s opinion in Charles vs. Southern Baptist

A note to CPS’ participants and friends:

The Florida Supreme Court has adopted a restrictive interpretation of the PSQIA as it relates to Florida’s risk management and discovery laws.   Charles vs. Southern Baptist analyzes the relationship between the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act (the Act) and Florida laws that govern the development and protection of patient safety and quality material.  The Court’s opinion is available here.

Providers in Florida need to get local legal advice about the extent of the state law impact on their safety and quality work, as this is the first step in applying Charles.   Though the decision has no direct impact in other jurisdiction, it will be part of the ongoing discussion about PSO protections, so it is important to understand it. The key facts:

  • Florida has very specific requirements for hospital risk management, including staff licensure and submission of certain incident reports to the state.   The statute also requires the hospital to gather information via incident reports that may not be reported to the state, but which is necessary to carry out the mandated activities.
  • The discovery request specifically asked for reports prepared pursuant to parts of the statute.
  • The court recognized the applicability of the Patient Safety Act and accepted that the hospital had a PSES and that the information was utilized appropriately in that context, and therefore would be protected PSWP except for the state risk management and reporting requirements.
  • The court found that the need to gather the information under state law and to report some of it precluded it from being protected PSWP.

 

The Court held that patient safety work and the related reports, when required by state law, could not be PSWP, using the same analysis put forth by AHRQ in its Guidance last year. (AHRQ Guidance document available here.) Because the Charles information was collected or maintained for a purpose other than submission to a PSO or for dual purposes, the Court held it is excluded from the definition of PSWP contained in the PSQIA and the final rule.

This finding (that the requested information was not protected PSWP) is important when examining the next issue, whether the PSQIA pre-empts Florida Amendment 7. That provision eliminates any protection for “any records made or received in the course of business by a health care facility or provider relating to any adverse medical incident.”  This discussion won’t delve into the detailed interaction of the PSQIA definitions and Amendment 7, though the relationship is complicated.  The important thing for PSOs and their participants in other states is the Florida Court’s somewhat gratuitous finding that the PSQIA could not supersede or pre-empt Amendment 7.

CPS doesn’t recommend that its PSO participants assume that Amendment 7 has pre-empted the PSQIA. There are several reasons why PSO participants should not view this as established doctrine (or in non-legal parlance, a “done deal”):

  • The Court’s pre-emption finding may well be dicta–an opinion stated by a court that is not necessary for its decision.  Dicta can be informative, but carries little true weight as precedent.  Viewed narrowly, this is just the Florida Supreme Court stating its opinion where it doesn’t really matter.
  • The Florida finding directly contravenes language in the PSQIA (Section 922): ‘‘(a) PRIVILEGE.—Notwithstanding any other provision of Federal, State, or local law, and subject to subsection (c), patient safety work product shall be privileged.”  This sets up a potential US Supreme Court appeal.  The US Supreme Court could either (1) accept the case and decide the pre-emption question or (2) find that the Florida Court’s statement was dicta and did not raise a real issue.

Applying Charles:

CPS has always advised its participants to divide their safety and quality work into 3 categories:

  1. Reports that have to be submitted under state or other federal law,
  2. Work that is required to be done and related documents that must be generated but not reported under state or other federal law, and
  3. Work that is not required by other law.

 

Under Charles, documents produced to meet an independent state law requirement (Category 1) are not eligible to be PSWP. Work product that results from other state-required activities (Category 2) is in a gray zone and the answer may depend on state law and how you have structured the work.  If you have questions, contact CPS.  Review your mandatory activities and reports (bullets one and two above) and design your PSES to include work that is done outside those categories. Your PSES can always consider non-PSWP; the deliberations and analysis within the PSES can be protected, but the non-PSWP work product cannot.

There remains an open issue of admissibility in court for any of this information.  That is another fight for another day.

CPS will keep you advised of new developments.

CPS will keep you advised of new developments.

 

BLOG:

PSO Case Law: Ungurian v. Beyzman, et al., 2020 PA Super 105:

A recent Pennsylvania case shows how courts narrowly interpret the PSQIA, ignoring the D & A pathway and the clear language of the Final Rule. (Ungurian v. Beyzman, et al., 2020 PA Super 105). The cour

Joint Commission New Sentinel Event Alert 61: Managing the Risks of Direct Oral Anticoagulants:

The Center for Patient Safety wants to share this important harm-prevention advice from The Joint Commission and its Sentinel Event Alert: Managing the Risks of Direct Oral Anticoagulants. The Joint Commis

CPS Safety Watch/Alert – Culture Can Improve the Control of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms:

Issue: A number of events reported co CPS’ Patient Safety Organization (PSO) demonstrate poor handoff communication about the patients’ infectious disease status Examples include: Patient with

Read More

RESOURCES:

The Center for Patient Safety believes that collaboration and sharing are the best ways to drive improvement. We strive to provide the right solutions and resources to improve healthcare safety and quality.