The Second Victim Experience – Train-the-Trainer Workshop

January 20, 2017    |   By: Jennifer Lux

Most health care providers adjust well to the multitude of demands encountered during an unexpected or traumatic clinical event. Providers often have strong emotional defenses that carry them through and let them “get the job done.” Yet sometimes the emotional aftershock (or stress reaction) can be difficult. Signs and symptoms of this emotional aftershock may last a few days, a few weeks, a few months, or longer.

Program Objectives

  1. Describe the ‘second victim’ phenomenon and high risk clinical events.
  2. Describe the six stages of second victim recovery.
  3. Utilize components of the Scott Three tier model of support to design a plan for your organization.
  4. Develop a plan to deploy peer support team training.

Upcoming Workshops
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
Mid-America Transplant
1110 Highlands Plaza Dr E #100
St. Louis, MO 63110-1350
REGISTER HERE

Hotel Information
Hampton Inn & Suites St. Louis at Forest Park
5650 Oakland Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110
hamptoninn3.hilton.com
(314) 655-3993

Additional information on Second Victim Experience here.

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