27 Missouri Hospitals Aim for 25% Reduction in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections by 2012

July 7, 2011    |   By: Calevir

Hospital Acquired Infection, HAI, meets aggressive new national and statewide program to lower risk, save lives and reduce cost.

Jefferson City, Missouri – July 7, 2011 – Twenty-five percent of hospital inpatients have an indwelling urinary catheter at some point during their hospitalization.   Each day, these patients have an estimated 5% risk of developing a catheter-associated urinary tract infection, or CAUTI.   This risk is multiplied each day the catheter remains in use.     CAUTI is the most common type of hospital-acquired infection, HAI, in U.S. hospitals equaling 40% of all HAIs.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that over 2 million HAIs occur in U.S. hospitals each year, and as many as 99,000 patients who get these infections die as a result. These infections also result in $4.5 billion in excess health care costs annually.

The Missouri Center for Patient Safety (MOCPS) is participating as state coordinator, along with ten other states as part of Cohort 2, in the AHRQ funded national patient safety project, CUSP/Stop CAUTI, which has proven to reduce dramatically incidents of CAUTI.

The MOCPS program, CUSP/Stop CAUTI Collaborative, began in March, 2011, and targets goals mirroring the national initiative: to reduce mean CAUTI rates in participating ICU and other clinical units by 25% and disseminate CUSP educational modules to improve patient safety.   The project closes in December of 2012.

The overarching program, Comprehensive Unit-Based Safety Program, CUSP, is a model developed by Johns Hopkins University geared specifically for bedside caregivers which provides specific methods and tools to promote consistent and safe practices at the hospital unit level to keep patients safe from acquiring HAIs and other hospital-acquired conditions.

CUSP/Stop CAUTI has two objectives: Teach the bedside staff of a typical hospital unit, such as an ICU or medical-surgical floor, the components of CUSP and instruct them on evidence-based clinical interventions to prevent CAUTI and apply them to daily practice.

The CUSP/Stop CAUTI project is partially funded by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City, and is being managed in collaboration with the Missouri Hospital Association and the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative.

Missouri is also participating in the national CUSP/Stop BSI (blood stream infection) project which began earlier this year, and currently has 44 states enrolled.

“States, hospitals and units learn from each other while working together in the collaborative model,” said MOCPS assistant director, Carol Hafley.   “The Center’s role as state coordinator provides hospitals with assistance during implementation to foster this learning and develop a support network to ensure the project’s success with every facility.”

Participating Missouri hospitals include:

  • Bothwell Regional Health Center
  • Callaway Community Hospital
  • Cass Regional Medical Center
  • Centerpoint Medical Center
  • Citizens Memorial Hospital
  • Cooper County Memorial Hospital
  • Cox Medical Centers
  • Golden Valley Memorial Hospital
  • Hannibal Regional Hospital
  • Jefferson Regional Medical Center
  • Kindred Hospitals St. Anthony’s
  • Kindred Hospitals St. Louis
  • Liberty Hospital
  • Missouri Orthopaedic Institute
  • Missouri Southern Healthcare
  • North Kansas City Hospital
  • Ozarks Medical Center
  • Pemiscot Memorial Health Systems
  • Research Medical Center
  • Saint Joseph Medical Center
  • Saint Luke’s East Lee’s Summit
  • Saint Luke’s Hospital
  • Saint Luke’s Northland Hospital
  • Saint Mary’s Medical Center
  • Skaggs Regional Medical Center
  • St. John’s Mercy Hospital – Washington
  • Truman Medical Center – Hospital Hill

Kansas hospitals include:

  • Cushing Memorial Hospital
  • Saint Luke’s South Hospital
  • University of Kansas Medical Center

More About MOCPS – The Missouri Center for Patient Safety was founded by the Missouri Hospital Association, Missouri State Medical Association and Primaris as a private, nonprofit corporation to serve as a leader to fulfill its vision of a health care environment safe for all patients, in all processes, all the time. www.mocps.org

Hospital Acquired Infection, HAI, meets aggressive new national and statewide program to lower risk, save lives and reduce cost.
 

Steve Sanborn
MOCPS | Communications
573.636.1014

 

Jefferson City, Missouri – July 7, 2011 – Twenty-five percent of hospital inpatients have an indwelling urinary catheter at some point during their hospitalization.Each day, these patients have an estimated 5% risk of developing a catheter-associated urinary tract infection, or CAUTI.This risk is multiplied each day the catheter remains in use.CAUTI is the most common type of hospital-acquired infection, HAI, in U.S. hospitals equaling 40% of all HAIs.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that over 2 million HAIs occur in U.S. hospitals each year, and as many as 99,000 patients who get these infections die as a result. These infections also result in $4.5 billion in excess health care costs annually.

The Missouri Center for Patient Safety (MOCPS) is participating as state coordinator, along with ten other states as part of Cohort 2, in the AHRQ funded national patient safety project, CUSP/Stop CAUTI, which has proven to reduce dramatically incidents of CAUTI. The MOCPS program, CUSP/Stop CAUTI Collaborative, began in March, 2011, and targets goals mirroring the national initiative: to reduce mean CAUTI rates in participating ICU and other clinical units by 25% and disseminate CUSP educational modules to improve patient safety.The project closes in December of 2012.

The overarching program, Comprehensive Unit-Based Safety Program, CUSP, is a model developed by Johns Hopkins University geared specifically for bedside caregivers which provides specific methods and tools to promote consistent and safe practices at the hospital unit level to keep patients safe from acquiring HAIs and other hospital-acquired conditions.

CUSP/Stop CAUTI has two objectives: Teach the bedside staff of a typical hospital unit, such as an ICU or medical-surgical floor, the components of CUSP and instruct them on evidence-based clinical interventions to prevent CAUTI and apply them to daily practice.

The CUSP/Stop CAUTI project is partially funded by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City, and is being managed in collaboration with the Missouri Hospital Association and the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative.

Missouri is also participating in the national CUSP/Stop BSI (blood stream infection) project which began earlier this year, and currently has 44 states enrolled.

“States, hospitals and units learn from each other while working together in the collaborative model,” said MOCPS assistant director, Carol Hafley.”The Center’s role as state coordinator provides hospitals with assistance during implementation to foster this learning and develop a support network to ensure the project’s success with every facility.”

Participating Missouri hospitals include:

Bothwell Regional Health Center

Callaway Community Hospital

Cass Regional Medical Center

Centerpoint Medical Center

Citizens Memorial Hospital

Cooper County Memorial Hospital

Cox Medical Centers

Golden Valley Memorial Hospital

Hannibal Regional Hospital

Jefferson Regional Medical Center

Kindred Hospitals St. Anthony’s

Kindred Hospitals St. Louis

Liberty Hospital

Missouri Orthopaedic Institute

Missouri Southern Healthcare

North Kansas City Hospital

Ozarks Medical Center

Pemiscot Memorial Health Systems

Research Medical Center

Saint Joseph Medical Center

Saint Luke’s East Lee’s Summit

Saint Luke’s Hospital

Saint Luke’s Northland Hospital

Saint Mary’s Medical Center

Skaggs Regional Medical Center

St. John’s Mercy Hospital – Washington

Truman Medical Center – Hospital Hill

Kansas hospitals include:

Cushing Memorial Hospital

Saint Luke’s South Hospital

University of Kansas Medical Center

More About MOCPS – The Missouri Center for Patient Safety was founded by the Missouri Hospital Association, Missouri State Medical Association and Primaris as a private, nonprofit corporation to serve as a leader to fulfill its vision of a health care environment safe for all patients, in all processes, all the time. www.mocps.org

 

 

 

Steve Sanborn
MOCPS | Communications
573.636.1014

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