Safety Culture Assessment-Long Term Care

Culture impacts everything we do. The strongest cultures support employee engagement, promote open communication and the sharing of mistakes to foster improvement.  It’s no different in health care organizations.  But it can be hard to assess the culture in your own organization.

Learn about how the Center’s comprehensive safety culture survey can save you time and money and why measuring your culture is so important to improve resident safety.

FREE WEBINAR 9/14/2017

Thursday, September 14th from 1-2pm (Central)

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how taking the Survey on Patient Safety can help you improve patient safety:

Benefits of CPS Safety Culture Survey Services: •Deepest feedback reports in the industry!

  • Comprehensive reports at the organization and department-level!
  • SAVE TIME & MONEY! Save 30+ hours of administrative time. You’ll need about 2 hours for the entire process and we’ll take care of the rest!
  • ACCESSIBLE – online, anonymous survey with access via computer, smart-phone, tablet, etc
  • DATA ANALYSIS – data is analyzed for you
  • SUPPORT – we’ll talk with you about your results and guide you to your next steps

To Register, Click Here.

 

Florida Supreme Court’s opinion in Charles vs. Southern Baptist

A note to CPS’ participants and friends:

The Florida Supreme Court has adopted a restrictive interpretation of the PSQIA as it relates to Florida’s risk management and discovery laws.   Charles vs. Southern Baptist analyzes the relationship between the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act (the Act) and Florida laws that govern the development and protection of patient safety and quality material.  The Court’s opinion is available here.

Providers in Florida need to get local legal advice about the extent of the state law impact on their safety and quality work, as this is the first step in applying Charles.   Though the decision has no direct impact in other jurisdiction, it will be part of the ongoing discussion about PSO protections, so it is important to understand it. The key facts:

  • Florida has very specific requirements for hospital risk management, including staff licensure and submission of certain incident reports to the state.   The statute also requires the hospital to gather information via incident reports that may not be reported to the state, but which is necessary to carry out the mandated activities.
  • The discovery request specifically asked for reports prepared pursuant to parts of the statute.
  • The court recognized the applicability of the Patient Safety Act and accepted that the hospital had a PSES and that the information was utilized appropriately in that context, and therefore would be protected PSWP except for the state risk management and reporting requirements.
  • The court found that the need to gather the information under state law and to report some of it precluded it from being protected PSWP.

 

The Court held that patient safety work and the related reports, when required by state law, could not be PSWP, using the same analysis put forth by AHRQ in its Guidance last year. (AHRQ Guidance document available here.) Because the Charles information was collected or maintained for a purpose other than submission to a PSO or for dual purposes, the Court held it is excluded from the definition of PSWP contained in the PSQIA and the final rule.

This finding (that the requested information was not protected PSWP) is important when examining the next issue, whether the PSQIA pre-empts Florida Amendment 7. That provision eliminates any protection for “any records made or received in the course of business by a health care facility or provider relating to any adverse medical incident.”  This discussion won’t delve into the detailed interaction of the PSQIA definitions and Amendment 7, though the relationship is complicated.  The important thing for PSOs and their participants in other states is the Florida Court’s somewhat gratuitous finding that the PSQIA could not supersede or pre-empt Amendment 7.

CPS doesn’t recommend that its PSO participants assume that Amendment 7 has pre-empted the PSQIA. There are several reasons why PSO participants should not view this as established doctrine (or in non-legal parlance, a “done deal”):

  • The Court’s pre-emption finding may well be dicta–an opinion stated by a court that is not necessary for its decision.  Dicta can be informative, but carries little true weight as precedent.  Viewed narrowly, this is just the Florida Supreme Court stating its opinion where it doesn’t really matter.
  • The Florida finding directly contravenes language in the PSQIA (Section 922): ‘‘(a) PRIVILEGE.—Notwithstanding any other provision of Federal, State, or local law, and subject to subsection (c), patient safety work product shall be privileged.”  This sets up a potential US Supreme Court appeal.  The US Supreme Court could either (1) accept the case and decide the pre-emption question or (2) find that the Florida Court’s statement was dicta and did not raise a real issue.

Applying Charles:

CPS has always advised its participants to divide their safety and quality work into 3 categories:

  1. Reports that have to be submitted under state or other federal law,
  2. Work that is required to be done and related documents that must be generated but not reported under state or other federal law, and
  3. Work that is not required by other law.

 

Under Charles, documents produced to meet an independent state law requirement (Category 1) are not eligible to be PSWP. Work product that results from other state-required activities (Category 2) is in a gray zone and the answer may depend on state law and how you have structured the work.  If you have questions, contact CPS.  Review your mandatory activities and reports (bullets one and two above) and design your PSES to include work that is done outside those categories. Your PSES can always consider non-PSWP; the deliberations and analysis within the PSES can be protected, but the non-PSWP work product cannot.

There remains an open issue of admissibility in court for any of this information.  That is another fight for another day.

CPS will keep you advised of new developments.

CPS will keep you advised of new developments.

 

Survey on Patient Safety – Hospitals Webinar

Culture impacts everything we do.  And it’s no different in health care organizations.  The strongest cultures support employee engagement, promote open communication and the sharing of mistakes to foster improvement.

Learn about how the Center’s survey administrative survey can save you time and money and why measuring your culture is so important to improve patient safety.

January 19th, 2017  Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6869850183608418820

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how taking the Survey on Patient Safety can help you improve patient safety:

Benefits of CPS Safety Culture Survey Services:

  • Deepest feedback reports in the industry!
  • Comprehensive reports at the organization and department-level!

SAVE TIME & MONEY! Save 30+ hours of administrative time.  You’ll need about 2 hours for the entire process and we’ll take care of the rest!

  • ACCESSIBLE – online, anonymous survey with access via computer, smart-phone, tablet, etc
  • DATA ANALYSIS – data is analyzed for you
  • SUPPORT – we’ll talk with you about your results and guide you to your next steps

Hospital PSO 101 – What you should know

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how joining a PSO can help you meet the requirements of the new CMS regulation for requirements under the Affordable Care Act by January 2017:
1. Learn the benefits of joining a Patient Safety Organization (PSO)
2. Learn how joining a PSO can support your patient safety efforts
3. Learn how the PSO protections can apply to your organization
This webinar is open to healthcare professionals in hospitals with a desire to improve patient safety and reduce patient risk, including professionals working in quality, risk, patient safety, quality improvement, and legal staff, executive leaders, and outside counsel and consultants for hospitals or health systems.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4956149095952724996

PSO – What you should know webinar

The Center for Patient Safety is hosting a webinar to share information and answer questions on how joining a PSO can help you improve patient safety at your organization:

  • What are the benefits of joining a PSO?
  • How can a PSO support your patient safety efforts?
  • How can PSO protections apply to your organization?

The webinars are open to healthcare professionals with a desire to improve patient safety and reduce patient risk, including professionals and leaders working in quality, risk, patient safety, quality improvement, and legal staff, executive leaders, and outside counsel and consultants.

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2390725685072610052

AHRQ Trigger Tool

AHRQ has published a new trigger tool that identifies harms due to hospital care among children.  The tool uses electronic or written data to retrospectively identify adverse events in pediatric patients. “This tool will help doctors and other practitioners caring for children to develop safer practices,” said AHRQ Director Andy Bindman, M.D. “A reliable trigger tool will help clinicians recognize potential safety concerns quickly from routine information collected from the medical record. Making providers aware of this information will help them avoid similar mistakes in the future.”

Tool is available here.

AHRQ Releases ASC Patient Safety Culture Survey

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has added a new healthcare provider survey to their suite of surveys. The latest release is the ambulatory surgery services (ASC) survey. In general, the AHRQ surveys are designed to measure the culture of an organization. The survey captures opinions and attitudes of staff, while the results of the survey can locate cultural strengths and weaknesses. Often the survey is part of an improvement initiative that involves surveying every 12-18 months in order to gauge improvements over time.

AHRQ defines ASCs as facilities 1) where patients have surgeries, procedures, and treatments and are not expected to need an inpatient stay, and (2) that have been certified and approved to participate in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ ASC program.

Interested in finding out more about the ASC patient safety culture survey? Check out resources on AHRQ’s website.

Hospitals Can Offer AHRQ’s Free “Taking Care of Myself Brochure to Patients Being Discharged

In support of Patient Safety Awareness Week (March 4-10), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) offers a bilingual guide that can help hospitals reduce their readmission rates by better preparing patients for self-care and follow-up appointments before they leave the hospital. The guide-Taking Care of Myself: A Guide for When I Leave the Hospital/Cómo cuidarme: Guía para cuando salga del hospital-is available as a printed document or fillable PDF that clinicians can complete in the hospital and share with patients before they leave. The guide is adapted from Project RED (Re-Engineered Discharge), which was funded by AHRQ and developed by Brian Jack, M.D., and colleagues at Boston University Medical Center. For a copy of the guide in English, go to:  http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/goinghomeguide.htm  or in Spanish, visit:  http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/goinghomesp.htm

To order print copies, email your request to  AHRQPubs@ahrq.hhs.gov  or call  800-358-9295.

For the brochure in English, please reference AHRQ No. 10-0059 with your request, or for the brochure in Spanish, please reference AHRQ Pub. No. 10-0059-C.

 

Next Survey on Patient Safety Culture Begins April 2nd!

Are you ready for AHRQ’s Survey on Patient Safety culture at your location?   Submit your interest form for the April 2nd survey cycle by Thursday, March 8th!

Did you know?   The patient safety culture survey provides feedback on your organization’s communication, teamwork, patient safety, leadership, and staff engagement?   The results can be used to improve your current culture and improve patient satisfaction, reduce liability exposure, improve staff satisfaction, reduce staff turnover, reduce liability insurance, and much more! (more…)

AHRQ’s Perspectives on Safety

Lawrence Smith, MD, founding dean of the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, recently gave an  interview, on resident supervision and patient safety. Listen to an excerpt online or download a podcast. An accompanying  perspective piece, by C. Jessica Dine, MD, MA, and Jennifer S. Myers, MD, University of Pennsylvania, examine how increased supervision influences the educational experience for trainees.

(more…)

BLOG:

Patient Safety Awareness Week 2018:

Patient Safety Awareness Week 2018 March 11 to March 17

Following a Medical Error: What Patients Want:

Becker’s Infection Control shared a summary of an article from JAMA Internal Medicine with results of interviews completed with 27 patients regarding what they want from their physician following a medic

2017 MarCom Awards Recognize EMSForward for Marketing Excellence:

The Center for Patient is proud to announce the EMSForward Campaign booklet has received a Platinum Award, the highest honor, in the 2017 MarCom Awards. The EMSForward campaign booklet won in the non-profi

Read More

RESOURCES:

The Center for Patient Safety believes that collaboration and sharing are the best ways to drive improvement. We strive to provide the right solutions and resources to improve healthcare safety and quality.