Second Victim Experience


Register Here

  • Date: Monday, March 19, 2018
  • Time: 8:00 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Location: Mid-America Transplant Services
    1110 Highlands Plaza Drive East, Suite 100
    St. Louis, MO 63110
  • Hotel Information: Hampton Inn & Suites St. Louis at Forest Park
    5650 Oakland Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110
    Phone: (314) 655-3993  Fax: (314) 655-3994
  • Cost: $399 per person ($349 for each additional person from the same organization)
  • Subscribers receive a 20% discount:  Log in to register and receive 20% discount

Download Flyer

About Second Victims

Most health care providers adjust well to the multitude of demands encountered during an unexpected or traumatic clinical event. Providers often have strong emotional defenses that carry them through and let them “get the job done.” Yet sometimes the emotional aftershock (or stress reaction) can be difficult. Signs and symptoms of this emotional aftershock may last a few days, a few weeks, a few months, or longer.

Who is a Second Victim?

Second victims are “healthcare providers who are involved in an unanticipated adverse patient event, medical error and/or a patient related injury and become victimized in the sense that the provider is traumatized by the event.”

The second victim phenomenon can occur to any healthcare provider, in any organization, for example, hospitals, EMS, LTC, home health & hospice, pharmacies, medical offices and physicians, ASCs, etc.

Frequently, Second Victims…

  • Feel personally responsible for the unexpected patient outcomes
  • Feel as though they have failed the patient Second-guess their clinical skills
  • Second-guess their knowledge base

Second Victim Fast Facts

  • Each second victim (even those involved in the same event) will have unique experiences and needs
  • Regardless of job title, providers respond in predictable manners.The six stages of second victim recovery explain how the second victim is impacted by the clinical event.
  • There are some events that are high risk for inducing a second victim response
  • First tendency of providers is self isolation
  • Providers tend to ‘worry’ in a predictable pattern
  • Sometimes the entire team is impacted by a clinical event

CPS supports the Second Victim Program as another component on the path to culture improvement. While we often focus on the impact on family members of patients experiencing an adverse event, the care of our providers following an event is equally important.

Educational & Training Programs

In collaboration with the University of Missouri Health System Second Victim Program, the Center for Patient Safety supports the Second Victim Program and offers a day-long train-the-trainer program. The workshop from MU Health Care offers a way to learn more about the program developed in part by one of their own staff, Sue Scott, PhD, RN, Manager-Patient Safety and Risk Management at University of Missouri Health Care.

Check for upcoming webinars or workshop locations and dates.

The workshops provide insight into the experience as well as interventions of support and provide instruction so that each participant returns to their organization with the knowledge, skills, and techniques necessary to support and train their peers.

Learn More

Contact us today!

Other Pages You Might Like


CPS Safety Watch – Respiratory Compromise:

BACKGROUND Respiratory Compromise is a state in which there is a high likelihood of decompensation into respiratory insufficiency, respiratory failure or death, but in which specific interventions (enhance

IHI offers free teleconference:

Heads up!  The University of Chicago completed a survey of over 2500 adults regarding their experiences and perceptions of medical error.  Results:  1 in 5 Americans reported a medical error in their ow

CPS Participates in Primaris Podcast to Launch PSAW 2018!:

The podcast has just been released. Listen to the discussion on why Patient Safety Awareness Week is such a valuable time for patients and providers. Alex Christgen, Executive Director, and Lee Varner, Pat

Read More


The Center for Patient Safety believes that collaboration and sharing are the best ways to drive improvement. We strive to provide the right solutions and resources to improve healthcare safety and quality.